National News – Agencies to Announce Conservation Successes for Imperiled Species in Eastern Kentucky

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Forest Service will host a ceremony to celebrate conservation successes in eastern Kentucky.  Collaborative conservation efforts between federal and state conservation agencies and other partners on the Daniel Boone National Forest are benefitting two imperiled species unique to Kentucky—the white-haired goldenrod and the Kentucky arrow darter.  At this event, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will make an announcement about the status of the white-haired goldenrod under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Additionally, the two federal agencies will sign a Candidate Conservation Agreement to protect the Kentucky arrow darter and its habitat on the Daniel Boone National Forest.

Who:               Tony Tooke, Regional Forester, Southern Region, U.S. Forest Service

Mike Oekter, Deputy Regional Director, Southeast Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Bill Lorenz, Forest Supervisor of the Daniel Boone National Forest, U.S. Forest Service

 

When:             Monday, August 31, 2015 at 1:00 p.m. ET

 

Where:           Gladie Visitor Center on the Daniel Boone National Forest. The address is 3451 Sky Bridge Road Highway 715, Stanton, Kentucky.  Directions are available on the Gladie Visitor Center website at: www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/dbnf/recreation/recarea/?recid=39566

 

Photo and       At the conclusion of the ceremony, Regional Forester Tooke and Southeast Deputy

video op:         Regional Director Oetker and other agency staff will be available to answer questions.

 

Following the ceremony, a field visit to Grays Arch is scheduled to see white-haired goldenrod in its natural habitat.

 

Details:           White-haired goldenrod was listed as threatened under the ESA in 1988.  The plant is only found in sandstone rock shelters or on sandstone cliffs with overhanging ledges in the Red River Gorge region of eastern Kentucky.

 

Kentucky arrow darter, a small fish found in headwater streams in the upper Kentucky River basin in eastern Kentucky, is a candidate for protection under the ESA.  The Candidate Conservation Agreement to be signed at the event is a voluntary tool designed to proactively conserve plants and animals prior to any final listing decision.

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